Sharing your business ambitions to build beautiful will help lessen the negative perceptions of development

Sharing your business ambitions to build beautiful will help lessen the negative perceptions of development

Written by Sarah Park, Head of Investment, Development and Regeneration at Madano.

I don’t think anyone would argue the importance of building beautiful. The industry debate about the impact of our environment on how we feel is not new. Society might not associate space and design directly with health and wellbeing, but they know that looking at areas that are visually appealing makes them feel better than staring at rows of grey, homogenous blocks.

Whether you agree with the authors of Build Beautiful, the collection of essays published by Policy Exchange last week, or the sentiment of last year’s Building More Building Beautiful report, the central theme of both of highlighting the importance of raising the standard of new homes and places across the country, is something we should all champion.

Today, the design, function and safety of our buildings are under scrutiny. With society’s continued scepticism of developers, development and regeneration, those brands that have a purpose and aim to make a difference are often instead tarnished by a long-standing, negative perception of the wider industry. Meanwhile, household brands Amazon and Google are busy exploring or investing in companies that build prefabricated homes.

From a communications point of view, it is more crucial than ever that businesses across the built environment turn their narrative towards society and share with it their ethos and ambitions to build beautiful, sustainable places and spaces. Not just to achieve planning permission or sell flats and a lifestyle, but because they share a vision to develop structures and spaces that are socially cohesive, enrich lives and are safe to live in.

These are visions often discussed, but the Industry has a habit of talking to itself. This theme has been reiterated across numerous London property events, that the industry must engage society, speak to people, communicate its ambitions to create beautiful sustainable spaces for people to live and work in.

Those industry brands that genuinely want to deliver on this sentiment are doing themselves a disservice by not talking to their end-user audiences and building a reputation for their ambition to develop for the greater good.

Our investment, development and regeneration (IDR) team provides strategic communications for companies across every stage of the property lifecycle; from real estate investment and advisory, through to design, construction, development and management.

Stop and Go Traffic for Autonomous Vehicles

Stop and Go Traffic for Autonomous Vehicles

Sign up to Madano’s Weekly Summary of Key Developments in Artificial Intelligence

S I G N U P H E R E http://eepurl.com/dzoxpf

A busy week for DfT’s press office with regulatory reforms aimed at opening up trials of autonomous vehicles receiving front-page treatment in The Times on Wednesday. The article headline proclaimed that driverless cars will be on UK roads by the end of the year and went on to describe how the changes would scrap the requirement for a safety driver. A flurry of reaction ensued in media comment and letters to the Times – many pouring cold water on the timeline offered and pointing to stringent safety standards that would need to be passed in order for trials to be approved. Many experts do not believe that the technology is advanced enough for any firms to pass the Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles’ requirements any time soon.

In particular, Nicole Kobie offered a strongly worded rebuttal in WIRED, highlighting that Waymo is probably the most advanced player in autonomous cars, but that even its vehicles currently need safety drivers “in case of rain.”

The letters page was similarly inundated. Christian Wolmar, a vocal critic of autonomous vehicles and author of the acerbically titled Road to Nowhere, pointed to the lack of public desire for AVs and the fact that they will make more of our transportation sector privatised.

We need a public discourse somewhere between optimism and cynicism. DfT should be lauded for seeking to create a legal framework that enables the UK to be a pioneer. However, hasty trials that lead to death or injury have the risk of backfiring spectacularly, which could set the adoption of self-driving technology back a number of years in the UK. Beyond the current technology limitations, the ethical questions that are important to the insurance and legal sectors are exceptionally thorny. Prepare to read more and more about trolley tests.

News in Brief:

Around Whitehall:

AI and digital design to transform future of UK construction

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/ai-and-digital-design-to-transform-future-of-uk-construction

Upcoming AI Events

Sign up to Madano’s Weekly Summary of Key Developments in Artificial Intelligence

S I G N U P H E R E http://eepurl.com/dzoxpf

error: Content is protected !!